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WELDMENT ANALYSIS

 

THE PROBLEM

Commodore Technology is an industry leader in the design and manufacture of machinery and tooling for producing Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) Foam products. Click here to visit Commodore Technology’s website.

In order to increase the service life of their EPS machinery, Commodore partnered with Endesin to better understand the stresses that one of the critical machine weldments experiences while in service. This allowed Commodore to analyze multiple design changes and subsequently find the most effective changes for the desired increase in service life.

 

THE ANALYSIS            

The steps used to perform the analysis were as follows:

  • CAD models were received from Commodore Technologies in the form of NX files.
  • The CAD models were simplified to remove any features that did not contribute to the structural integrity of the weldment or were too small to be meshed reliably and the different plates that make up the weldment were split as necessary to accommodate hexahedral meshing.
  • The plates that make up the weldment components were meshed using 20-node parabolic hexahedral elements.
  • Beam elements and connection elements were added to model the bolts connecting the weldment to the frame.
  • The load was applied to the bottom of the weldment and a fixed constraint was applied to each bolt.
  • The analysis was linear static analysis and the results revealed the areas of the weldment that should be strengthened to increase the service life.
  • Multiple design changes were subsequently analyzed to determine which was most effective and this design change was implemented.

 

THE TOOLS

The analysis was completed using NX Advanced Simulation for pre and post processing and the solver was NX Nastran.

 

THE SOLUTION

Commodore Technology wanted to increase the service life of their EPS machinery and by partnering with Endesin, they were able to first understand what kind of stresses a critical component experiences while in-service and subsequently determine how different design changes would alleviate these stresses before any physical changes were made.